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  2020 is on its way out of our collective memory, though not without fully overhauling life as we’ve known it. At The CAMP, we kicked the year off by starting from scratch, adding new and wildly talented artists to our darling roster (i.e., making loads of new friends), partnering with FAMA for a 40-artist exhibition, leaving our Little River home and setting up shop in North Miami, and even the launch of a brand-new virtual gallery with the help of Emperia, UK.   Which made us curious—how has the unruly intensity of the new decade impacted those we work closest with? In the

  2020 is on its way out of our collective memory, though not without fully overhauling life as we’ve known it. At The CAMP, we kicked the year off by starting from scratch, adding new and wildly talented artists to our darling roster (i.e., making loads of new friends), partnering with FAMA for a 40-artist exhibition, leaving our Little River home and setting up shop in North Miami, and even the launch of a brand-new virtual gallery with the help of Emperia, UK.   Which made us curious—how has the unruly intensity of the new decade impacted those we work closest with? In the

Welcome to CAMP Conversations, an editorial space brought to you by The Contemporary Art Modern Project! At The CAMP, we’re firm believers in the power of the intimate relationship between art and those who love art, and we’re happy to champion it in our approach to a nearly-inaccessible industry. CAMP Conversations are written to promote thoughtful dialogue exploring the art industry embedded with our sophisticated brand of snark, involving artists, gallery employees, and our beloved audience.   Johnny Ramstedt is an abstract artist who works in a variety of media, often creating pieces that are restricted to one or two color blocks. As stated on his

    Welcome to CAMP Conversations, an editorial space brought to you by The Contemporary Art Modern Project! At The CAMP, we’re firm believers in the power of the intimate relationship between art and those who love art, and we’re happy to champion it in our approach to a nearly-inaccessible industry. CAMP Conversations are written to promote thoughtful dialogue exploring the art industry embedded with our sophisticated brand of snark, involving artists, gallery employees, and our beloved audience.   I'm CAMP creative, curator, and art dealer Andres J. Mora, taking over this little space for the first time to facilitate our readers a look

Happy November!    October was a whirlwind in The CAMP Gallery, not just because of the success of our two exhibitions: 40 Women Pulling at The Threads of Social Discourse: F.A.M.A & Guests, and Feminism From South to North, but also because we moved locations! Bye-bye Little River, Hello North Miami! Thanks Jan for all you did, and Gabe, Maria, and Andres! I am super excited to announce that our new gallery address is: 791 N.E. 125th Street, North Miami. Our new space is much smaller and more intimate, which is a nice change! Here, we aim to forge more connections for our artists,

    What started off as an interest in American 1950’s Pop Art for artist Emma Coyle back in the early 2000’s, has grown into a multitude of work which represents a strong want to make very precise individual images.   Coyle is a multidisciplinary artist and has been based in London since 2006. Early in her career she solely worked on figurative painting. Influenced by first wave Pop Art but using themes which branched from 1920’s Japanese advertisements to American silver screen images as starting points. Her focus was to recreate images with a contemporary flare.     As Coyle worked throughout the past 14 years

Getting to October has been something of a task this year, the reason being that during the early days of COVID,  Fiber Artists - Miami Association  (FAMA) formed and with that came October’s exhibition.     Evelyn Politzer, Alina Rodriquez Rojo, and Aurora Molina, all fiber artists in Miami, came together (from a distance) and formed this organization to create a niche for fiber arts, to work together to make different projects and frankly to becoming a force in the Miami Art Scene. Last year at the gallery we held a textile exhibition: Women Pulling at the Threads of Social Discourse, where women fiber

    Welcome to CAMP Conversations, an editorial space brought to you by The Contemporary Art Modern Project! At The CAMP, we’re firm believers in the power of the intimate relationship between art and those who love art, and we’re happy to champion it in our approach to a nearly-inaccessible industry. CAMP Conversations are written to promote thoughtful dialogue exploring the art industry embedded with our sophisticated brand of snark, involving artists, gallery employees, and our beloved audience.   This is the first CAMP Conversation I’m having with someone whose process I’ve bared witness to. It’s also the first CAMP Conversation where part of it took place while

Trying to adapt to a new “normal” is cause alone for intense reflection, and because  we’ve pressed pause on all of our favorite distractions (RIP happy hours), this reflection often gives way to nostalgia for pre-COVID times, more specifically those way before any semblance of a novel virus was heading our way. When we dissect ourselves, we’re naturally bound to think back to the experiences that radically shifted our sense of self and the relationships we create with the world around us.   The pandemic has also radically shifted the vision the art industry had for 2020. Gallery spaces are lonelier, studio

At The CAMP Gallery, September kicks off with the second edition of The Hamptons Virtual Art Fair, where we are exhibiting works by Dominik Schmitt, Joseph Ginsberg and Drew Doggett.   Dominik Schmitt is a German artist deeply focused on the internal, and often fragmented, reality distorted by individual interpretations. There is a certain ‘tongue in cheek’ approach to his works, also reflected in their titles. One of my favorite works and one that has received a lot of attention from people like Jerry Saltz, is Oasis, which depicts a human with a boar’s head, comfortably situated on a yellow inflatable kid’s